Ghostwire: Tokyo – See Tokyo and Die

This is a game where you are stuck in another dimension, and the only way to escape is to see it all.

Ghostwire: Tokyo – See Tokyo and Die

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a game that was released in 2017. It has been developed by the creators of the iconic “Ghost Recon” franchise. The game takes place in Japan and you play as an American soldier who is sent to Tokyo after it has been taken over by Ghostwire, a terrorist group that wants to start World War 3.

REVIEW – With Ghostwire: Tokyo, Tango Gameworks has left the survival-horror genre behind and arrived on the beaches of action-adventure gaming. Shinji Mikami (Resident Evil, Dino Crisis) formed the company, which offers us to explore Tokyo and fight a mystery abnormality in a supernatural epic. Could Bethesda Softworks’ open-world game have left a lasting impression?

 

 

It’s been a long time since I’ve played a AAA open-world game that didn’t exhaust me before the end. Ghostwire: Tokyo has a similar length to other games in the genre from a decade ago. If you play through the main plot and all of the side material, you’ll have spent more than 20 hours. This is a vast cry from most recent games, which are bloated to the point of being unplayable. The plot is engaging at times, but it is overshadowed by the exploration and battle. Both are entertaining, even if the battle has a number of flaws, notably a lack of variety.

 

 

“This town is approaching as if it were a ghost town.” (From “The Specials”)

 

According to the narrative, Tokyo is plagued by a sinister ritual. People’s bodies vanish throughout the city as their souls are taken by a maniac wearing a Hannya mask who attempts to resurrect the dead. He is never given a name, and his objectives are unclear. When the Ghostwire: Tokyo tale starts, Akito, the main character, is as dead as everyone else, yet his corpse hasn’t vanished. Akito’s body is possessed by the ghost of the recently dead necromancer KK, who sensed Akito’s passion for all things spiritual. Akito is hesitant at first to assist KK in stopping the Hannya-masked villain, but eventually chooses to do so in order to safeguard his unconscious sister.

His sister, Mari, is abducted by the bad guy because “she is the key to his wicked scheme,” for whatever reason. His strategy is a mystery, as is why Mari is a part of it. The game never explains or attempts to make sense of this massive coincidence, so you’ll simply have to accept it.

While Ghostwire: Tokyo’s tale isn’t horrible, the game’s characters are simply that: characters. No one is especially fascinating or distinctive. For example, Akito is an ordinary person who finds himself in an exceptional position. KK is a seasoned and persistently cranky “expert” (similar to The Shark’s senior shark hunter) who is continually dishing out harsh realities. (Muhahaha!) The evil person is terrible and does bad things because… he’s bad by nature.

 

thegeek Ghostwire Tokyo 6

 

You’ve never seen Tokyo like this before.

 

So, suffice it to say, Ghostwire: Tokyo isn’t known for its story – but, considering its many cliché-free twists and turns, it’s not horrible either. The magnificent atmosphere and wonderfully produced ghostly Japanese metropolis of Ghostwire: Tokyo is, however, the major reason you’ll keep coming back to this game after you’ve gotten into it. The graphics are stunning, and if you ignore the fact that everything is haunted, you’ll think you’re wandering around Tokyo, thus exploring the city is a fantastic experience. Simply said, it’s the finest virtual picture of Tokyo you’ll ever see in a game, including the Yakuza games.

To make this exploring even more entertaining, the game is filled with numerous collectibles, providing you lots of reasons to rush about enthusiastically chasing them down. Even if it’s only for the manner you have to utilize paper dolls called katashiro to rescue the spirits that the main villain hasn’t captured. In return for experience and money, you upload such ghosts into phone booths (which still exist in Tokyo).

Ghostwire: Tokyo includes a surprising amount of parkour in terms of gameplay. Akito can scale most roofs after learning to tether himself to the Tengu (or “ghost birds”) that swarm the city early on. You may summon the Tengu to numerous ledges later in the game if you spend the skill points — it essentially functions as a Batman-style grapple.

Roaming the rooftops and collecting ghosts while battling adversaries and keeping an eye on side objectives and numerous collectibles is a fantastic experience. In Tokyo, there are more than 50 Jizu sculptures, which will improve your ammunition supply. Unfortunately, they’re difficult to see since their outlines blend in with the rest of the rubbish when you utilize your spectral vision skill. There is also no easy method to discover them, thus finding the majority of them might be tough. The same can be said about the game’s random collectibles, however they serve no function in terms of gameplay.

 

thegeek Ghostwire Tokyo 7

 

You aren’t a phantom ninja…

 

Fighting in Ghostwire: Tokyo is exciting and entertaining, but it is not without flaws. One of them is that it is deficient in fundamental abilities for no apparent reason. Akito is granted just three ethereal energies to shoot with, and they are rapidly depleting. Early on, he discovers wind (quick), water (broad but short-range), and fire (stronger and rarer) strikes, which he may enhance via his skill tree. Although the shooting is a basic method, it is nonetheless a fun experience as you eliminate spooky and angry ghosts.

One of the issues is that since you only receive three major attacks early on, things get fairly monotonous pretty soon. You don’t learn anything new, and the skill tree doesn’t provide anything in the way of significant advancement. As a result, Akito doesn’t make much progress for the majority of Ghostwire: Tokyo. He may, however, utilize a bow and talismans, but you must purchase ammunition to use them. Of course, this implies that collectors are unlikely to put them to use.

The lack of fire energy adds to the difficulty. By slamming certain floating objects or killing foes, you continually recharge your wind and water energy. However, fire energy is far more limited. As a result, you’ll mostly switch between two assaults throughout the game. You may charge these strikes to vary their effects, but it won’t help you overcome the constraints of your assaults. Enemies will usually assault you with melee attacks, which you may block (perfect defence negates all damage). Still, Akito lacks evasion and true mobility, which means he can’t dodge, which is the game’s main flaw. When a well constructed dodge would have made battle much more pleasurable, this makes you feel lethargic in combat.

 

thegeek Ghostwire Tokyo 8

 

Despicable acts, dirty, obnoxious enemy waves

 

In terms of difficulty, it’s a little strange because, although Normal mode seems to be too easy in theory, so you switch to Hard, it suddenly becomes too challenging at specific points in the game. It’s true that when you raise your health (by leveling up and ingesting healing consumables) and acquire prayer beads that improve your damage, the game becomes a lot simpler. Some adversaries, on the other hand, strike you with some really cheap and brutal attacks, and the damage done by various foes isn’t constant enough: some enemies injure you too much and can knock you out in only one or two hits. You’ll also have to deal with some terrible waves from time to time, since the game loves to put you in confined spaces with foes that spew missiles at you. Otherwise, the AI isn’t extremely tough, but the adversaries in this game are quite cunning at times. While you’re focused on the combat, an adversary lurking behind a line of adversaries in front of you is poised to strike.

However, if you do enough damage to an adversary, their core will come out of their spirit body, which is a fascinating fighting mechanism. If you grasp it (either with a rope or your own hands), you will immediately kill the adversary. Assume, however, that you are attacked from behind while clutching the core. In such situation, the adversary cancels the death animation and seals the weak spot, indicating that you lost the chance to kill it swiftly. This may be aggravating, particularly if you’re attacked in the aforementioned covert manner.

Other, fairly unprofessional combat-related game design ideas, however, caused Ghostwire: Tokyo’s combat system to bleed significantly. It’s a pity, since if the makers hadn’t made any faults in this area, this game might have been a great masterpiece.

 

thegeek Ghostwire Tokyo 9

 

One of the most stunning PlayStation 5 games

 

Both major console makers spoke about how great ray tracing would be before launching the next generation of consoles. Still, the fact is that just a few games take use of the effect to the point where it’s really remarkable. Fortunately, Ghostwire Tokyo is one of them: the game is stunning, due in part to the ray-tracing effect. I specifically tried the game on the PlayStation 5 and had no technical issues, although I’ve seen reports of inaccuracy and tearing around mouse movement in PC testing. That is, if you turn it on, since there are only five possible options on the PlayStation 5, and only one of them supports ray tracing. Unfortunately, you must forego 60 frames per second, but I believe that for this game, 30 frames per second is well worth it for the sake of the aesthetics.

The PS5’s DualSense force feedback functionality is truly remarkable on a technological level. Every raindrop, spell, and punch is properly felt thanks to Sony and the game’s creators’ technology.

However, we can’t complain about the vast quantity of information available while visiting the city. I spent 22 hours playing Ghostwire: Tokyo’s main plot, finishing all of the principal side stuff and locating 70% of the spirits. There are a number of side tasks in the game, most of them are pretty intriguing, but they all have to be finished in the same manner. Many of them have their own plots, and most of them include Akito and KK putting an end to a curse or solving other mysterious riddles. They’ll also need talismans and hand seals to do so. Completing these side tasks will win you a magatama prize, which will allow you to unlock new skills. You play as an onmyouji (a Japanese “magician” with supernatural abilities), which I found fascinating. You’ll also have to deal with a large number of youkai.

There are a few boss battles, but they are sparse and almost non-existent — especially the last encounter, which seemed like a squandered opportunity. You can go back and finish everything you’ve missed so far after you’ve completed the game, but you won’t acquire any additional stuff. Only prayer beads are provided, which may be used to charge spirits without the need of a payphone. If you choose to start anew, you may take specific items with you to a new game.

 

 

 

Is it true that all roads lead to Tokyo?

 

It’s uncommon that a game captivates me so much, despite its flaws. Even if the fighting isn’t as excellent as it might be and the plot is mediocre (thanks to the dull characters and protagonists), I had a great time with Ghostwire: Tokyo and couldn’t put it down till I completed it. It’s a little antiquated, and many diehard FPS fans would probably dismiss it as too light. However, the environment is so entertaining, and acting as an onmyouji is so much pleasure, that once you’ve visited this ghostly Tokyo, you won’t easily purchase a return ticket.

-BadSector-

Pro:

+ On PS5, Tokyo’s artwork is breathtakingly gorgeous, with excellent DualSense support. Addictive, entertaining gameplay with a wealth of content, including things to collect + The game’s representation of Japanese mythology and spirituality is really evocative.

Against:

– The plot is mediocre, with uninteresting characters and language – There is no dodge, and the combat has additional flaws. – Difficulty level is a little “mixed up” — sometimes it’s too simple, sometimes it’s too challenging.


Bethesda Softworks is the publisher.

Tango Gameworks is the creator of this game.

Genre: Horror action-adventure in an open world

The film will be released on March 25, 2022.

REVIEW – With Ghostwire: Tokyo, Tango Gameworks has left the survival-horror genre behind and arrived on the beaches of action-adventure gaming. Shinji Mikami (Resident Evil, Dino Crisis) formed the company, which offers us to explore Tokyo and fight a mystery abnormality in a supernatural epic. Could Bethesda Softworks’ open-world game have left a lasting impression? It’s been a long time since I’ve played a AAA open-world game that didn’t exhaust me before the end. Ghostwire: Tokyo is roughly as old as the genre’s games were a decade ago….

GHOSTWIRE: TOKYO – DIE IN TOKYO

GHOSTWIRE: TOKYO – DIE IN TOKYO

2022-04-01

BadSector

It’s uncommon that a game captivates me so much, despite its flaws. Even if the fighting isn’t as excellent as it might be and the plot is mediocre (thanks to the dull characters and protagonists), I had a great time with Ghostwire: Tokyo and couldn’t put it down till I completed it. It’s a little antiquated, and many diehard FPS fans would probably dismiss it as too light. However, the environment is so entertaining, and acting as an onmyouji is so much pleasure, that once you’ve visited this ghostly Tokyo, you won’t easily purchase a return ticket.

8.2 out of 10 for gameplay
9.2 for graphics
7.2 for the story
7.8 out of 10 for music and audio
8.4 Ambience

8.2

EXCELLENT

It’s uncommon that a game captivates me so much, despite its flaws. Even if the fighting isn’t as excellent as it might be and the plot is mediocre (thanks to the dull characters and protagonists), I had a great time with Ghostwire: Tokyo and couldn’t put it down till I completed it. It’s a little antiquated, and many diehard FPS fans would probably dismiss it as too light. However, the environment is so entertaining, and acting as an onmyouji is so much pleasure, that once you’ve visited this ghostly Tokyo, you won’t easily purchase a return ticket.

Be the first to leave a comment!

Related Tag

  • ghostwire tokyo true ending
spot_img

Subscribe

Related articles

SUNOVO Wireless Controller for PS3 Review

SUNOVO Wireless Controller for PS3 ReviewOverview Recommended for...

MEGACOM FlashFire Controller Charger Review

MEGACOM FlashFire Controller Charger ReviewOverview Recommended for these...

CHENGDAO Wireless Controller Review

The CHENGDAO Wireless Controller is a great controller for...

Nintendo 2DS XL Carry Case Review

If you're looking for a Nintendo DS case that...